Categories

See More
Popular Forum

MBA (4887) B.Tech (1769) Engineering (1486) Class 12 (1030) Study Abroad (1004) Computer Science and Engineering (988) Business Management Studies (865) BBA (846) Diploma (746) CAT (651) B.Com (648) B.Sc (643) JEE Mains (618) Mechanical Engineering (574) Exam (525) India (462) Career (452) All Time Q&A (439) Mass Communication (427) BCA (417) Science (384) Computers & IT (Non-Engg) (383) Medicine & Health Sciences (381) Hotel Management (373) Civil Engineering (353) MCA (349) Tuteehub Top Questions (348) Distance (340) Colleges in India (334)
See More

Understanding Python super() with __init__() methods [duplicate]

General Tech Bugs & Fixes
Max. 2000 characters
Replies

usr_profile.png
Pooja Bhardwaj

User

( 7 months ago )

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to understand the use of super(). From the looks of it, both child classes can be created, just fine.

I'm curious to know about the actual difference between the following 2 child classes.

class Base(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Base created"

class ChildA(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        Base.__init__(self)

class ChildB(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        super(ChildB, self).__init__()

ChildA() 
ChildB

usr_profile.png
Atul Kasana

User

( 7 months ago )

super() lets you avoid referring to the base class explicitly, which can be nice. But the main advantage comes with multiple inheritance, where all sorts of fun stuff can happen. See the standard docs on super if you haven't already.

Note that the syntax changed in Python 3.0: you can just say super().__init__() instead of super(ChildB, self).__init__() which IMO is quite a bit nicer. The standard docs also refer to a guide to using super() which is quite explanatory.

what's your interest


forum_ban8_5d8c5fd7cf6f7.gif