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I just received a written offer letter. Can I negotiate salary? [duplicate]

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User

( 5 months ago )

This question already has an answer here:

So I received an offer from Company A (hooray!) with an hourly wage and benefits package. It's a little short of what I was hoping for. How should I approach negotiating salary, if at all? Salary range was never brought up in my interviews or application, and Company A gives off the impression that the pay is set in stone. I would be employed by a private company that is contracted at a government agency. Not sure if that makes negotiating pay easier or more difficult.

Still, I know they are in a rush to hire someone to fill this position before Christmas, so I might be able to leverage them into giving me a bit more money. I have never negotiated salary before (this is actually my first full-time job too) and am a total novice at how to approach this topic. I would really appreciate any help that you could provide!

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User

( 5 months ago )

You can negotiate until you sign the letter or tell them that you accept. Tell them exactly the way you said here, "It's lower than I was expecting and I really need more".

Since it's government org, they may be more limited but I would negotiate. They can find the money or take it out of their own profit. Or they can lose you. Don't be afraid to walk away either. Better to not have that job rather than a job you are unhappy with.

Remember, it's a two-way street. You're not Oliver Twist begging for "More?". It's got to be a good situation on both sides. Never forget that they need you as well. Just like they can decide to go with someone else, you're free to decide to reject their offer or ask for a higher one.

what's your interest


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