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When are IT departments considered dominant or near dominant coalitions? [closed]

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User

( 5 months ago )

After working in four different organizations as a developer or business analyst role, I have noticed that IT departments and IS departments can be considered second-class citizens, even when they produce externally facing, revenue producing products.

What are some instances in which IT departments have power for strategic influence in a company, beyond being up to date with current technologies?

By strategic influence, I'm referring to the ability to define what the product is and it's scope, rather than just executing commands from other departments.

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User

( 5 months ago )

Well, it's easy to provide an example. My small company provides specialised and general IT services to other companies and/or govt depts. So I value my techs and programmers much more than I do the sales and admin staff. And some of the services I now provide were actually dreamed up by the IT.

I'm sure there's other examples, in my country, in general even normal IT are treated with the same sort of deference as managers (except amongst themselves)

what's your interest


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