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When do I withdraw from a search?

Career Talk Job Search Queries
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Liza Sain

User

( 4 months ago )


I was offered a job with Company A, and verbally accepted. We're in the process of sending off the official offer letter and a background check, but things seem to be moving along quickly/confidently.

I've withdrawn from any searches that haven't started yet (first round interviews, haven't submitted new applications) but I'm waiting until everything's signed off before withdrawing from the 4 other active searches I'm in. With the holidays around the corner, most searches have been closing in the next few days. However, one company has asked to reach out to my references before moving onto the next step. (This hasn't happened before - most companies have just called up references unannounced!) I know that's not a definite "we're going to hire you!" but I hate to have them spend their last full work week before Christmas going through the process to make me an offer when I've accepted elsewhere. However, everyone has told me not to withdraw until I have the offer in hand, so I'm hesitant to do so now.

tldr: Is it appropriate to withdraw prematurely?

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Priyanka Chadda

User

( 4 months ago )


If you withdraw now and the offer you're expecting doesn't come through for whatever reason, you've withdrawn from the alternatives that were most advanced. You could go back to them and say "um, could we restart that?", but you'd look bad. So you're giving up what might be your #2 choice on the promise of #1, and if #1 doesn't happen you're going to have to pick up with companies that were less promising. That's a lose for you. Further, as TheEvilMetal pointed out in a comment, that #2 might turn out to be your #1 if they make you an even more compelling offer before the other company gets that written offer together.

If you withdraw now and the offer you're expecting does come through, then they will have wasted some time. Not a lot of time if you're just talking about a reference check; in my experience that's half-hour conversations with two or three people. A company that is hiring expects to spend a lot of time on candidates who they don't ultimately hire -- because they decided against you, because you took another offer, because you and they couldn't agree on the package, because of a family issue, or other things. Spending time in pursuit of candidates who don't work out is part of the cost of doing business. You didn't accept an offer (causing them to stop looking) and then withdraw; companies, like candidates, keep all options open until everybody's signed an agreement.

what's your interest


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