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3D theory before graphics APIs? [closed]

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User

( 4 months ago )

I'm a software engineer and I'm hoping to move my career towards game development. I'm reading a book right now on 2D using C++/DirectX. When I get into 3D I know I want to do it correctly. For example, I know nothing about 3d space. So if I learn only an API I might know it but I don't know if I can develop an interractive mini 3d world with it. I wouldn't call myself successful just having a rotating crate with the latest shaders etc. My math skills are up to trig/linear algebra and still in college. I know more math is to come. Should I be reading on 3D theory books before picking up on OpenGL/Direct3D, or any other suggestions? I just know an API isn't going to teach 3D game development and don't want to be lost afterward. I'm very book-oriented so that's fine if there's suggestions there too. Thoughts are welcome. Thanks!

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User

( 4 months ago )

After dissing you on the other site I feel obliged to answer :)

I'm not any professional myself, but I did take a 3D Computer Graphics course in my university and it really helped me understand APIs I ended up using.

Among things I found especially useful:

  1. Transformation matrices and how they work, not only for object transformations but also for viewing transformation, perspective projection etc. That's probably the most important thing.
  2. The whole theory behind lightning and shadow, especially useful when you start dabbling into shaders.
  3. Texture sampling, mipmapping.
  4. Color theory and blending techniques is also useful.

And I definitely think that these are subjects that can be picked up from just reading a book or two on the subject, as long as you have the mathematical background.

what's your interest


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