Categories

See More
Popular Forum

MBA (4887) B.Tech (1769) Engineering (1486) Class 12 (1030) Study Abroad (1004) Computer Science and Engineering (988) Business Management Studies (865) BBA (846) Diploma (746) CAT (651) B.Com (648) B.Sc (643) JEE Mains (618) Mechanical Engineering (574) Exam (525) India (462) Career (452) All Time Q&A (439) Mass Communication (427) BCA (417) Science (384) Computers & IT (Non-Engg) (383) Medicine & Health Sciences (381) Hotel Management (373) Civil Engineering (353) MCA (349) Tuteehub Top Questions (348) Distance (340) Colleges in India (334)
See More

How to quickly find what scales you can play over a chord

Course Queries Syllabus Queries
Max. 2000 characters
Replies

usr_profile.png
Liza Sain

User

( 5 months ago )

For example, if I get a lead sheet I have never seen before and it has a chord that is not in its center key, how can I easily recognize what mode or scale to play over it when improvising?

usr_profile.png
Karlie Kloss

User

( 5 months ago )

Looking at chord tones and the chords themselves is probably a better approach in this circumstance. So, if you are playing in C major, and a Gm7 chord appears, you could simply play a phrase from a Gm7 arpeggio. Or, you could stay in C major and be more careful about the notes you choose...for example, a Gm7 chord contains the notes G-Bb-D-F, three of which (G,D,F) are in the C major scale - so you could play those notes from C major, and make sure to avoid the B note in C major (which might not sound the best in this context). Or, you could play the Bb note instead of the B note in C major while the Gm7 plays. C major scale notes over the Gm7 chord also imply different tensions, for example, if you played an A note from C major, that would imply a Gm9 chord. As long as you know what you are doing, feel free to be weird...that's jazz.

what's your interest


forum_ban8_5d8c5fd7cf6f7.gif