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How to study (by heart) all the equations in inorganic chemistry? [closed]

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Rahul Chaudhary

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( 5 months ago )

Physical chemistry is easy to study as I have to just understand the concepts (like in physics) and apply some equations for calculations. In organic chemistry, reaction mechanisms helpsin remembering a lot of reactions and also doing conversion problems help a lot.

But, in the case of inorganic chemistry it is very difficult for me to remember those equations. My high school syllabus includes a lot of preparation methods of different compounds and reactions showing their chemical properties. But, unlike organic chemistry there is no problems based on it for deep understanding. So, what is actually needed is a good memory power. But, I'm not able to remember all those equations. So, how should I study them?

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Liza Sain

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( 5 months ago )

In organic chemistry, everything is based around C, H, O and N. Therefore to understand reactivity (somehow), there is just limited number of options.

In contrast, inorganic chemistry deals with the rest of periodic table, and each of the elements has its special properties. But there are general trends as well, but are more difficult to decipher and are often expressed by set of typical reactions, you should learn.

Usually they concern the stability of (oxidation) states, how to go from less stable to more stable one to obtain the desired compound and few processes how tho achieve the least stable state from the one found in nature.

It is difficult to state some simple rules, but there are several most typical anions and cations, and the chemistry of given element is just interactions with them. During the learning it helped me to have "all" the reactions (several hundreds) on a paper and for each one try to understand what happens and if there are others in the set, which are similar, and why. This helps you to spot the similarities. And - it is better to have more reactions then less, because then you have higher probability to spot the trends.

what's your interest


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